Nutritional epidemiology

Nutrition has been thought to be important in cancer – as much, if not more so, than tobacco. Diet has been considered especially important for cancers of the gastrointestinal tract and for breast cancer and prostate cancer.

We developed our Nutritional Epidemiology Theme to address this gap in knowledge, with a strong focus on dietary assessment and on prospective studies. The dietary questionnaires developed for this purpose have gained wide acceptance by the public health community in Australia. We continue working to maintain our leading edge in this technology.

Current projects

The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (Health 2020)

The predictors of type 2 diabetes in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study

Diet and Cancer Pooling Project

Risk factors for prostate cancer

Dietary risk factors for colorectal cancer

Risk factors for lymphohaematopoietic malignancy

Provision of dietary analysis to other researchers

Development and evaluation of tools for dietary epidemiology

 

 

The predictors of type 2 diabetes in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study

Investigator(s): Allison Hodge, Dallas English, Graham Giles, Maria Makrides* (*External collaborator)

Objective(s): To examine associations between lifestyle factors, particularly diet, and incidence of type 2 diabetes within the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

 

Pooling Project of Prospective Studies of Diet and Cancer

The Pooling Project is an international consortium of at least 28 cohort studies with the goal of analysing diet and cancer associations using standardised criteria across studies.

The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study is involved because it has used a comprehensive dietary assessment method to measure usual diet.

CED Investigators: Graham Giles, Roger Milne,

Objectives:

To evaluate whether diet and cancer associations are consistent across cohort studies comprised of different populations with different dietary habits.

For each association, we generate summary estimates, which have greater precision than any of the individual studies due to the larger sample sizes.

To examine whether associations differ for specific population subgroups (ex: between men and women; among never, past and current smokers; between lean and overweight individuals) or for different histologic types or subsites of specific cancers.

Risk factors for prostate cancer

Investigator(s): Baglietto L, English DR, Giles GG, Hopper JL, MacInnis RJ, Severi G

Objective(s): To determine the lifestyle risk factors for prostate cancer.

Dietary risk factors for colorectal cancer

Investigator(s): Dallas English, Graham Giles, Allison Hodge, Robert MacInnis, John Hopper*, Finlay MacRae*, Mark Jenkins*, Robert Gibson*, Andrew Haydon* (*External collaborators)

Objective(s): To determine the dietary risk factors for colorectal cancer.

Risk factors for lymphohaematopoietic malignancy

Investigator(s): Robert MacInnis, Dallas English, Graham Giles

Objective(s): To determine the risk factors for lymphohaematopoietic malignancies.

Provision of dietary analysis to other researchers

Investigator(s): Allison Hodge, Graham Giles

Objective(s): To provide a tool for dietary studies to researchers around Australia.

Development and evaluation of tools for dietary epidemiology

Investigator(s): Allison Hodge, Julie Simpson, Dallas English, Graham Giles

Objective(s): To develop and evaluate tools for dietary epidemiology.