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Early Detection Saves Lives

Protect your health against cancer

Health professionals want to see you, so don’t delay if you notice any unexplained symptoms or need to get up to date on cancer screening.

Get up to date with cancer screening and learn more about early detection

Use our interactive table below to learn more about cancer screening and how to take action if you notice a change or unexplained symptom.

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  • Bowel cancer information

  • Cervical cancer information

  • Skin cancer information

  • Breast cancer information

  • Prostate cancer information

  • Blood cancer information

  • Liver cancer information

  • Other cancers information

Cancer information

Blood cancers are the third biggest cause of cancer deaths across Australia, claiming more lives each year than breast cancer or skin cancer. If you are concerned about blood cancer or if you have any symptoms, don't delay and speak to a doctor.

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Over 90 per cent of all bowel cancers can be successfully treated if found early. People aged 50–74 will receive a free bowel screening test in the mail every two years from the Australian Government. It’s important for everyone to be aware of bowel cancer symptoms and to speak to a doctor if you notice any symptoms, especially if you have a family history of bowel cancer.

Learn more about symptoms

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Over 90 per cent of all bowel cancers can be successfully treated, if found early. It’s important for everyone to be aware of symptoms and don’t delay speaking to a doctor if you notice them. It’s also important to speak to a doctor if you have a family history of bowel cancer.

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Over 90 per cent of all bowel cancers can be successfully treated, if found early. If you're aged 50–74, you will receive a free bowel screening test in the mail every two years from the Australian Government. Don’t delay, make sure you’re up to date with bowel cancer screening. It’s quick, easy and can be done from home. If you notice any symptoms, even if your last screening test was normal, speak to a doctor.

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Over 90 per cent of all bowel cancers can be treated if found early. For people aged over 74, be aware of symptoms, and don’t delay speaking to a doctor if you notice them.

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BreastScreen Victoria provides free mammograms to women, and trans and gender diverse people aged 50–74 with no breast symptoms, every two years. It’s important for women, and trans and gender diverse people of all ages to be breast aware and check for changes in your breasts.

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It’s important for women and trans/gender diverse people aged under 50 to be breast aware and check for changes in your breasts. If you notice a change, don’t delay and speak to a doctor.

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BreastScreen Victoria provides free mammograms to women and trans and gender diverse people aged 50–74 with no breast symptoms, every two years.

Although it is rare, all genders should be aware of symptoms and see a doctor without delay.

Book your mammogram at BreastScreen Victoria

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For women and trans/gender diverse people aged 75 and over it is important to be breast aware and check for changes. Although it is rare, all genders should be aware of symptoms and see a doctor without delay.

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Cervical cancer is one of the most preventable cancers. Women and people with a cervix aged 25–74 need regular cervical screening every five years. If you’re due for a Cervical Screening Test, or have never had one, book an appointment with a cervical screening provider.

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Cervical cancer is one of the most preventable cancers. Women and people with a cervix aged 25-74 need regular cervical screening every five years. If you’re due for a Cervical Screening Test, or have never had one, book an appointment with a cervical screening provider.

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Women and people with a cervix aged 75 and over should be aware of any unexplained symptoms that could be a sign of cervical cancer. If you have any, don’t delay and book an appointment with a doctor.

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Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Australian men (apart from common skin cancers). There are about 18,100 new cases in Australia every year. If you notice unexplained symptoms, don't delay, speak to a doctor and get checked.

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Skin cancer affects two in three Australians. If you notice changes to your skin, don’t delay and speak with a doctor or dermatologist about regular skin checks.

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Liver cancer is the fastest rising cause of cancer death in Australia. The most common risk factor for liver cancer is long-term infections of hepatitis B or hepatitis C. If you are at risk of hepatitis, or have concerns speak to a doctor.

Learn more about liver cancer

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For more information about different cancer types, symptoms, as well as familial cancers,  please visit our website.

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The last few years have affected our health priorities and caused changes to our health system, meaning many Victorians may have missed regular appointments and cancer screening. Don’t delay - health professionals are available to speak to you about early detection and cancer screening.

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Do you need support?

If you need support finding a doctor or other health professional, use our guide.

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For cancer information and support, contact Cancer Council on 13 11 20 to speak to an experienced nurse.

Contact cancer support

Watch our Early Detection video

Early detection saves live

Frequently asked questions

What is early detection?

The earlier we find cancer, the better our chances of treating it. Some cancers can be detected at an early stage when treatment is likely to be more effective. There are tests your doctor can recommend which may find cancer early well before any symptoms are present which are called cancer screening. There are also tests available through national screening programs for breast cancer, cervical cancer and bowel cancer. These tests are provided free of charge for people who are eligible. It is also a good idea to get to know your own body. If you notice any changes, such as a lump in your breast or a spot growing on your skin, see your doctor.

What is this early detection campaign about?

Cancer Council Victoria’s Early Detection campaign aims to increase the number of Victorians practicing early detection and health seeking behaviours to protect more people from cancer. This includes seeing a healthcare professional when they notice unexplained symptoms and booking a health check.

Why is Cancer Council Victoria doing this campaign?

Cancer Council Victoria wants to ensure that all Victorians have the best chance to live a life free of cancer. Over the past few years, we know there have been significant changes to our health system, with many people missing regular health checks or cancer screening. But it is time to ensure all Victorians who are eligible for our national bowel, breast and cervical cancer screening programs participate. We also want to encourage Victorians who notice any unexplained changes or symptoms to take action and book an appointment with a healthcare professional. The campaign is funded by the Victorian Government Department of Health.

How can health professionals help promote this campaign?

We want to encourage health professionals to have discussions with patients about early detection and health seeking behaviours, including discussing cancer screening with their patients and checking if they are due. This campaign will also provide health professionals with campaign materials and resources to promote early detection to their patients.

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Questions about cancer?

Call or email our experienced cancer nurses for information and support.

Contact a cancer nurse