Sistas, get checked!

 

Cervical screening art

 

Aboriginal artist Madison Connors, a Yorta Yorta, Dja Dja Wurrung, Kamilaroi woman from North East Victoria has created art inspired about the importance of cervical screening.

The artwork will form a travelling art show that will visit eight Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations in regional Victoria across 2019 and 2020.

Check out the art and have a yarn about women’s health.

Exhibitions

Winda-Mara Aboriginal Corporation

21 Scott Street, Heywood, Victoria 3304
7-10 October, 9am-5pm every day

Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-operative (Harmony Building)

20 Rumbalara Rd, Mooroopna, VIC 3629
12-14 November, 9am-5pm every day

Entrance to all exhibitions is free, and there will be door prizes and fun activities available. Bring a sister along!

Stay deadly, look after your health

As women, we’re busy looking after our family and the rest of our mob but it’s also important to look after ourselves.

This includes keeping our body healthy and getting our health checks done. One of the regular tests that we should do is the Cervical Screening Test.

Cervical cancer is a problem in our mob, it is the fifth most common cancer in Indigenous women. Incidence of cervical cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women is more than two times that of non-Indigenous women.

We need to look after our health and the health of our sisters by taking part in cervical screening.

The Cervical Screening Test

The Cervical Screening Test checks the health of your cervix. It looks for HPV infection so that it can be found early, before it has a chance to become cervical cancer.

If you’re aged 25 to 74, having a Cervical Screening Test every five years is the best way to look after your health.

 

Cervical screening art

 

The Cervical Screening Test is done by a doctor or nurse at your Aboriginal health service, or other practice. The test takes less than ten minutes and isn’t painful. Find out more about the test.

Don’t be shame, get checked sistas! There are safe options available for our mob. Get your health check, speak to your Aboriginal Health Worker, visit the art exhibition in your area, or call 13 11 20 to speak to Cancer Council.

This project is funded by a grant from The Ian Potter Foundation.

About The Ian Potter Foundation

The Ian Potter Foundation is one of Australia’s major philanthropic foundations. The Foundation makes grants nationally to support charitable organisations working to benefit the community across a wide range of sectors including the arts, environment, science, medical research, education and community wellbeing. The Ian Potter Foundation aims to support and promote a healthy, vibrant, fair and sustainable Australia.