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CCV Seminar Series

Date(s): 2 Aug 2016
Time: 12 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: 615 St Kilda Road, Level 3 Meeting Rooms (312 & 313)
A/Prof Vicki White, Principal Research Fellow, Cancer Council Victoria
 
What are the care experiences of Australian Adolescents and Young Adults (AYAs) with cancer?

 

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer are a unique, yet poorly understood patient group. Neither children nor the common age for adult cancer, most AYAs are treated in hospitals with limited experience with this population. This presentation will discuss results from one of the first large-scale studies to quantitatively assess AYA's care experiences. The study involved 200 young people (15 to 24 year-olds) with cancer who were surveyed about their care experiences. Participants were recruited through the cancer registries in Victoria and NSW and were on average 21-years-old (SD=3.03) and 8.5 months (SD=4.14) post-diagnosis when surveyed. The majority had undergone surgery (70%) and/or chemotherapy (61%), with 31% having radiotherapy. Most patients were satisfied with their treatment (94%) and felt their treatment was age-appropriate (87%). However, only around 34% of respondents thought the information they were given was relevant to their age, 15% did not understand the information provided to them, and 55% indicated that health professionals (HPs) always checked their understanding of information provided. The relationship between different health system factors and care experiences will be explored.

 
Dr Devesh Oberoi, Research Fellow, Cancer Council Victoria

 

The course of anxiety, depression and unmet needs in survivors of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma

 

Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and multiple myeloma (MM), the two most common haematological cancers, differ considerably in regards to clinical features, treatment, curability and relative survival. Despite these significant differences most studies examining the psychosocial outcomes of anxiety, depression and unmet needs in haematological cancer survivors have studied mixed haematological cancer samples which include leukaemia, lymphomas and myeloma. In this presentation we describe findings from a longitudinal study of 236 DLBCL and 178 MM survivors, recruited through the Victorian Cancer Registry, which aimed to determine whether the course of anxiety, depression and unmet needs, in the first two years of diagnosis, was similar for survivors of these two cancers. Our findings suggest that studying psychological outcomes in mixed haematological cancer samples may be inappropriate, at least in the early survivorship phase. To ensure psychosocial and supportive care interventions are appropriate to the needs of individuals with DLBCL and MM, separate studies of the experiences of people with these haematological cancer subtypes are needed. The current findings are useful in the context of informing resource allocation and appropriate service provision to survivors of DLBCL and MM.

Updated: 28 Jul, 2016