Understanding how blood cancers form

Lead researcher

A/Prof Carl Walkley

A/Prof Carl Walkley

Institution

St Vincent's Institute of Medical Research

Tumour type:

Leukaemia

Years funded

2017-2019

Project description

This project studies the mechanism by which mutations in a protein (Srsf2) cause blood cell diseases such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML).

Our findings will allow us to better understand how these cancers develop, and as a result, create models that can be used for testing new treatment approaches.

What are you trying to achieve?

We are interested in understanding how two types of related blood cancer - myelodysplastic syndrome and chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia - form.

We are trying to understand how genes that are mutated in both types of blood cancer do so that we can better understand how these cancers form.

What is your personal motivation?

Cancer is a fascinating process, albeit one with terrible consequences, and I am interested in understanding how normal processes can be hijacked to lead to the initiation and maintenance of cancer.  

Project timeline

2017  2018 
2019 

Define how the mutation alters normal haematopoiesis.

Determine how mutations cooperate in CMML initiation.

 
  

Define how the mutation alters normal haematopoiesis.

Determine how mutations cooperate in CMML initiation.  

 

Define how the mutation alters normal haematopoiesis.

Determine how mutations cooperate in CMML initiation.

"We are trying to understand how genes that are mutated in both types of blood cancer do so, so that we can better understand how these cancers form."

Collaborators

A/Prof Wallace Langdon, Dr Meaghan Wall, Dr Alistair Chalk