How does the protein hormone interleukin-3 regulate cell signalling in leukaemic cells

Lead researcher

Dr Urmi Dhagat

Dr Urmi Dhagat

Institution

St Vincent's Institute of Medical Research

Tumour type:

Leukaemia

Years funded

2017-2019

Project description

This project studies the mechanism by which a protein hormone (interleukin-3) activates abnormal signalling in leukaemic cells. Our findings will allow the development of new approaches to target and disrupt leukaemic cell survival.

What are you trying to achieve?

We want to find out more about what causes leukaemia and develop a new treatment. This research will have implications for all people diagnosed with this type of cancer.

Interleukin 3 (IL-3) plays an important role in promoting leukaemic cell growth and survival and is often involved in leukaemia relapse. Despite the central role played by IL-3 in blood cancer biology, little is known about how it contributes to cell growth and disease. Our study will use 3D structures of IL-3 to assess how the hormone controls signaling outcomes within the cell.

 

What is your personal motivation?

I was exposed to the stress and anxiety that cancer can bring on a family at a very young age. I've also experienced its impact as an adult when a close friend and mother-of-two passed away last year after being diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 32. She went through several chemotherapy sessions but none of them were effective in her case.

It's for these reasons that I am motivated and proud to be working in the field of cancer research. 

Project timeline

2017  2018 
2019 

Insights into affinity conversion using molecular dynamics.

Establish a structural basis for the differential signaling outcomes.

Distinguish signaling outcomes.

Use antibodies as tools to study receptor function.

 
  

Insights into affinity conversion using molecular dynamics.

Establish a structural basis for the differential signaling outcomes.

Distinguish signaling outcomes.

Use antibodies as tools to study receptor function.

 

Establish a structural basis for the differential signaling outcomes.

Distinguish signaling outcomes.

Use antibodies as tools to study receptor function.

"I truly believe that investment in scientific research can ensure a better future for cancer patients."

Collaborators

Dr Sophie Broughton, Prof Michael Parker, A/Prof Louise Purton

Updated: